In Review: NITE FIELDS – DEPERSONALISATION (felte, 2015)

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Nite Fields create music for those who prefer to shun daylight; those who brood on their own misery until night, hoping for a glimpse of the moon. Depersonalisation is an ethereal record, one that features benzo-laden, dreamy guitar gaze, overlaying softly pattering drums and delicate synth work – the perfect album for night-time wandering.

Depersonalisation, the new album from Brisbane / Melbourne band Nite Fields, is an exploration of light versus dark. In case the album art didn’t give you any indication, the interplay between day and night is a key thematic element, at least aurally. It’s a soundtrack of closed curtains, streetlights and moons behind clouds. Depersonalisation sits in the dark, yet there is a dappling of light that helps to add texture to the shrouded sound.

Overall, Depersonalisation is an ethereal record, one that features benzo-laden, dreamy guitar gaze, overlaying softly pattering drums and delicate synth work. Danny Venzin’s brooding monotone delivery lays on this album like a depressive fog, even when his voice is at its most expressive the words seems to merely be dribbling out of his mouth – as if giving these words is enough of an arduous task in the first place. Don’t get it twisted, it’s a complementary aesthetic. Everything works together to paint a picture of a world of malaise and isolation

Although loneliness and boredom lie languid on every note, there is a dark beauty about this album. It’s one long bummer, but indulging in bitter emotion is its own therapy at times. Depersonalisation sways between thoughts of infatuation and forlorn loss from song to song (‘You I Never Knew’, ‘Like A Drone’). I wouldn’t go as far to say that this is an entirely defeatist album, but there is a certain resignation from Nite Fields that seems as if they are consigned to their lonesome fate. The album takes you down empty streets at night, into dimly lit abodes, unkempt bedrooms and loveless relationships.

Although I said Depersonalisation is an observation of light and dark, you can be forgiven in thinking that the dark is more prominent throughout. Nite Fields create music for those who prefer to shun daylight; those who brood on their own misery until night, hoping for a glimpse of the moon. It’s not until ‘Winter’s Gone’ hits its latter half that the light does shine through. The moon emerges from behind the ever prominent clouds and the stars come out with it. It’s a beautiful end to a starkly beautiful album – but as the final notes twinkle out of existence, it leaves you wondering if the stars in the Nite Fields world are only prominent because there is no light on earth to counterbalance. Regardless, this album is haunting yet engrossing. I can’t say that it will leave you feeling good, but it will leave you feeling – light or dark, night or day, that’s what matters.

NITE FIELDS BANDCAMP / FELTE SOUNDCLOUD