In Review: BORED NOTHING – SOME SONGS (SPUNK RECORDS, 2014)

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Some Songs by Bored Nothing strikes me as a romantic album – not in a conventional “love song” sense, but as more of an intense, emotionally charged record that details the blissful highs, woeful lows, peaceful adoration, heart-wrenching jealousy and the inner vulnerability that goes hand in hand with genuine affection and dedication.

Fergus Miller excels in insular song-writing and recording; as Bored Nothing he presents as an awkward loner whose songs of social unease, self loathing and solitude are filtered through the lo-fi sound spectrum and emerged as damaged as his own self. Over the past few years, something in Fergus seems to have changed. Pieces have fallen into place, gaps have been filled and he has become a voice for disaffected youth and love starved individuals. Some Songs seems to showcase Fergus as a more complete human, still insular, still awkward, but with an altered purpose.

Some Songs strikes me as a romantic album – not in a conventional “love song” sense, but as more of an intense, emotionally charged record; one that details the blissful highs, woeful lows, peaceful adoration, heart-wrenching jealousy and the inner vulnerability that goes hand in hand with genuine affection and dedication. It plays like a young man emerging from his shell and discovering some self-worth yet is now trying to find a body to share his time with.

Musically, this album is very easy to listen to. There is daylight filtering through this record, still days and candlelit nights are evoked from the easy strumming of Fergus’s guitar. His vocals are uniquely affected; his high tones add delicacy when delicacy is needed and pain when the subject is suitably painful. The album moves from insular musings to more spacious and upbeat sounds during tracks such as “Come Back To” and “Song For Jedder”, where wheels start turning, the windows are wound down and you can feel air on your face. Bored Nothing begins cruising down the backstreets of the mind with keen observation, taking note of the terrain and documenting it in sepia tones. The production on Some Songs is a notch above the self-titled full length, and honestly I think it was the best choice Fergus could have made. While the previous album wasn’t as lo-fi as people make it out to be, the small details that Fergus is capable of weaving through his music would have been lost if he hadn’t taken the production up a notch.

I mentioned before how I found lead single, “Ice-Cream Dreams”, to be slightly lazy and boring. Well, I still stick to that judgement when the song is presented as a single; there were way better songs on this record that would have suited me better. Where I backpedal slightly is when the long is listened to as a part of the entire record it finds its place. Some Songs is an album, not just a collection of some songs as Fergus has dubbed it. These songs work best as a whole, and as a whole I will listen to it. Too much is lost without the context of the sonic surrounds the rest of the album brings.

Bored Nothing is one of the more uniquely charming and disarming acts in Australia due to the unassuming approach to music Fergus Miller takes. His bizarre mind and genuine musical talent make for an interesting pairing. I’m not sure if everyone can truly comprehend all of his vision and direction, but the yearning for someone to share your eccentricity and neuroses with is entirely relatable. Some Songs is a nice selection of tunes from a musician with considerable talent, it serves as another chapter in the mind of a young mans journey into adulthood, the stepping stones taken and the pitfalls succumbed to.

BORED NOTHING TUMBLR / SPUNK RECORDS