In Review: TRALALA BLIP – AUSSIE DREAM (DISEMBRAINING MACHINE, 2014)

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Aussie Dream is a great slice of Australian electronica; one that sets itself highly amongst the ranks of established practitioners. Each song communicates an honesty and love for music that is unrivalled – poignant and touching and entirely serious in its intent, to be shared.

I hadn’t heard of Tralala Blip until recently, my head has been other places in the music stratosphere lately, so it’s nice to be directed to something in a different gear.

On paper, Tralala Blip sounds like an amazing project. Formed in 2007 as a workshop for individuals with mental and physical disabilities, Randolf Reimann shared his electronic equipment with those in the class to use, and a loose collective formed. Over time, the collective turned into a legitimate band and Tralala Blip was created. They’ve formed wonderful partnerships with electronic artists around Australia, including Lawrence English of Room40, and have toured with the likes of Mad Nanna.

Aussie Dream is a full length album released through Disembraining Machine. The record is full of intricate and delicate arrangements – soothing and melodic, yet with enough quirky elements to keep you interested. It’s an enjoyable record and well composed addition to the underground electronic scene in Australia.

Lyrically, the album is imaginative. There are heartfelt love songs, songs about rejection, songs about the desire for change, songs about appreciation of nature. Each number communicates and honesty and love for music that is unrivalled – poignant and touching and entirely serious in its intent, to be shared.

Tralala Blip taught me a few things about the nature of music and the potential of those with mixed abilities. There is much to be said about the positive potential of introducing more in depth musical elements into disabled care.

In an interview with Crawlspace Magazine, Randolf Reimann communicated his anger at the patronizing way music was used in workshops. His approach indicates that there is a far greater level of interest and commitment to music in the disabled community than Australia at large cares to recognise. Using Aussie Dream as an example, one can clearly see that those with mixed capabilities are more than capable of creating interesting music and expressing emotion through sound than first realised.

Further introduction of music of a higher difficulty could be a beneficial expression form for the differently-abled and in Reimann’s own words, can create music “with a lack of ego and a lack of self consciousness – because of these omissions from the music making equation, the resulting self-expression was truly original.” That is something that I personally would love to hear more of in the future.

Tralala Blip – Soccer In Space from Fine Goods Productions on Vimeo.

Aussie Dream is a great slice of Australian electronica; one that sets itself highly amongst the ranks of established practitioners.

DISEMBRAINING MACHINE BANDCAMP / TRALALA BLIP WEBSITE